Sponsorship Lessons from the Arts

Word About their Sponsors story

Sponsorship is becoming more important than ever, particularly for the arts. So it was rewarding to open the Sunday newspaper and see an article devoted to how arts organizations and companies are coming together in a deeper way. Since sponsorship is my sweet spot, I perked right up. Here are my key  take-aways. (Click Article A Word from Their Sponsor 07 23 17 to read the whole Star Tribune story.)

The article says:

“Companies are devoting more dollars to causes that match their missions…”

“Typically, 75,000 people will see our summer musical, so that’s just a smart business decision…”

Kim says:

Audience is king. The better the match between your audience(s) and the people your prospect wants to reach, the better your chances of sponsorship success.

The article says:

“As companies’ philanthropic portfolios shrink or shift… makes it necessary that arts groups become more accomplished and adept at truly forming partnerships, not just holding out a tin cup.”

“Companies want meaningful engagement.”

“Corporations are much more concerned about the bottom line. They want to see a return on investment – which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.”

Kim says:

Sponsorship dollars come from the marketing budget – and are spent to help accomplish a marketing goal.

 

The article says:

“US Bank is not only sponsoring the artist-designed mini-golf, it’s inviting employees to play and offering discounts for cardholders…”

“It’s about… creating communities where we know our guests, our team members can thrive.”

Kim says:

The arts and education, in particular, can help sponsors meet goals about recruiting and retaining talent.

 

Does this spark new ideas for you? As always, I’m available to answer questions, or for “thinking out loud” about your sponsorship efforts.Article A Word from Their Sponsor 07 23 17Article A Word from Their Sponsor 07 23 17

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5 Signs You’re Sponsor Ready

sponsors welcomeAre you ready for sponsorship?

Yes, if you have:

1. Bandwidth. Sponsorship isn’t just about doing the work to sign a like-minded company. It’s also about going above and beyond to deliver the benefits promised — ensuring the sponsor’s goals are met. That takes staff/volunteer time.

2. Patience. Lead time may be from 6 to 12 months, with implementation after that.

3. Relationships. Board and staff leaders and friends must be willing to introduce you to marketing decision-makers at prospect companies.

4. Data. Prospects want to know who you represent, how many people you reach, and how you reach them.

5. Social media. Sponsors list presence in digital/social/mobile media as one of the most sought-after benefits, the top way to leverage their sponsorship, and a key metric to measure success.

 

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Ripped From the Headlines: Sponsorship is Marketing

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This gallery contains 2 photos.

Are you a fan of “ripped from the headlines”? There’s a whole genre based on this… from crossword puzzles to Jay Leno’s old late night segments to plots for TV dramas. They always catch my attention. That’s why I wanted … Continue reading

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Say the Magic Words for More Corporate Sponsorships

In previous posts, I’ve encouraged you to ditch the “Olympic medal” mentality and focus on creating corporate sponsorship benefits that meet the prospect’s goals. Here to echo the theme – and provide two really helpful phrases you can use right away Continue reading

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Score a Thank-You Touchdown

What kid wouldn’t love to charge out on the professional football turf though the same tunnel their favorite players use? Or what adult, for that matter? (Check out the photo album.)

That’s how 250 Minnesota students burst into 2013 Fuel Up to Play 60 Training Camp, a reward for implementing healthy eating and physical activity changes in their schools. Led by the Minnesota Vikings’ mascot, Viktor the Viking, and by the Midwest Dairy Council’s Princess Kay of the Milky Way, these kids spent a day running relay races, brainstorming next year’s programs, learning how their dairy foods are produced and meeting the newest Vikings quarterback, Matt Cassel.

It was almost as much fun for the adults to watch the kids’ excitement about this nonprofit program. Which is why Midwest Dairy invited its corporate funders and prospective funders to join in the fun.  Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school program designed to empower students to “fuel up” with nutrient-rich foods and get out to “play 60” minutes every day. It’s a joint venture founded by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in cooperation with USDA and endorsed by governors and agencies across the Midwest.

While Minnesota students enjoyed the Vikings playing field, students across the country got the chance to visit other stadiums for similar events, and some even won the chance to have an NFL player, alumni player or mascot visit their school.

Did I mention that adults are often as star struck as the kids?

Making the Connection: That’s what makes these events the perfect venue to say thank you to donors. Does your organization already have events that sponsors and partners could visit?

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